About Dr. Cindy



Always a student of the life sciences, Dr. Jones earned her Ph.D. in biochemistry from University of Cincinnati and was involved in cancer biology for several years. She also has expertise in toxicology, microbiology, and physiology and taught physiology for several years at several Colorado colleges. As a self taught herbalist she knows the value of using herbs and natural remedies to maintain health and promote sustainability. Besides formulating her own Colorado Aromatics products she does cosmetic microbiology and consulting for other cosmetics companies under Sagescript Institute, llc.

Previously Dr. Jones worked as a research scientist, a college instructor and is a published author.  She is a highly sought after research and development consultant to natural cosmetic and skin care industry leaders around the country.  Her passion for science and love of herbs was the catalyst for the launch of Colorado Aromatics Skin Care line.  Dr. Jones continually uses her knowledge to help both consumers and colleagues distinguish hype and marketing from reality when it comes to skin care.


Community
Cultivating community is important to us. You’ll find us most Saturdays at the Longmont Farmers market and occasionally the Boulder Farmers Market and others. We think it’s important to support local farms and businesses in this way. We donate products for local fundraisers and give soap and other products to local shelters as well as for victims of forest fires. We support our colleagues in the ‘soap and skin care’ community through participation in forums, education and even gifts for educational conferences.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hi Dr Cindy-I have begun reading your book The Antibiotic Alternative. Thank you for such pertinent information! A few months ago I was diagnosed with the Epstein Barr virus. Not surprising since I did have mono in my early 20s-quite some time ago-and have been severely fatigued for the past 5 years. My question is which herbs and nutrients can you recommend for treating this? Relief is badly needed. Thanks so much. Philip

Cindy said...

Hi Philip. Glad you found my book! Keeping your immune system strong is important. Echinacea and Astragalus are important here but need to go along with a healthy diet. Partner this with some antivirals such as garlic, elderberry and lemon balm. Some pain relievers like ginger might also be necessary. Unfortunately, this can be chronic - best of luck.

Georgia Wilson said...

Hi Dr Cindy,

I have just read your book "The Antibiotic Alternative" - what a great find!

I have already been quoting you all over my website and will surely be referring back to this book many times over.

I do have a question for you though - I apologize if this was explained and I didn't find it in there.

In chapter 4, Table 8: Types of stress, you have listed types of stress and what causes them. I was hoping you could perhaps point me to some further reading or information about this. It sounds along the lines of Louise Hay but I was wondering if there has been some further studies or information written about this subject.

Thank you so much for your help and your fantastic book. I will be keeping an eye on your blog.

Best Wishes
Georgia

Cindy said...

Hi Georgia, glad you enjoyed my book. The types of stress are basically divided into emotional stress and physical stress. The physical stress information could be found in physiology books whereas the emotional stress in psychology books. The do affect the body in similar ways though, initially by releasing epinephrine and long term by releasing cortisol.

Georgia Wilson said...

Fantastic - thank you so much for taking the time to reply. I'll have a look into some psychology books to learn more.
Best Wishes
Georgia

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